Dating of the new testament norman geisler

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But if He really was the Son of God, as the gospels state, then He could have prophesied the future. But that assumption is itself founded on mere assumptions. At face value, it makes more sense to say Mark was written before A. 70, for it seems unbelievable that Mark (whom critics agree was John Mark mentioned in Acts) would wait thirty to forty years to write down his gospel. If he wrote afterwards, he could not have portrayed the Romans only as friends.

(3) With regard to the arguments for a post-70 date for Luke, the first assumes Mark was not written before A. Is it really plausible to think that Mark would wait decades before writing his brief gospel, which would be so valuable in sharing and leaving with newly established churches as the gospel preachers went about teaching and preaching? As a matter of fact, Jesus’ prophecies are actually evidence that the gospels were written before A. 70, for Luke never casts the Romans in the role of enemies in his writings. Besides that, we have Josephus’s descriptions of the sacking of Jerusalem in A. 70, and many of the striking peculiarities of the city’s destruction are absent from the prophecies.

Warner Wallace in making the case for an early dating of both the Gospels and the epistles.

Such a portrayal of the Romans would have been possible before Nero’s persecution in A. 64, but afterwards it would have been an obvious and cruel misrepresentation.In any case, it is very apparent that the arguments for a post-70 date of the gospels hang together on certain unproved assumptions. No wonder Robinson can compare the current arguments for the dating of the gospels to a line of drunks reeling arm in arm down the street. Luke centers much attention on the events that took place in Jerusalem, but he mentions nowhere in Acts the destruction of the city in A. A second event noticeably absent is the Roman Emperor Nero’s terrible persecution of the Christians in Rome.(end of quotes from William Lane Craig) (a) There is no mention of events that happened between A. From the Roman historian Tacitus we learn that Nero covered the Christians with tar, crucified them, and used them as torches to light up Rome at night.For example, Jesus is called “the Son of Man” and “the Servant of God,” titles that soon faded into obscurity.Also Christians are still referred to as “disciples” and the Jewish nation as “the people.” Sunday is called “the first day of the week,” another early expression.

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