Facts on teenage dating abuse

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Emotional abuse and stalking can take place in person, electronically, via text, or online.Secondly, teen dating violence is just as dangerous and the impact is just as far reaching.For example, after such an assault, it is not uncommon to see teenagers neglecting schoolwork, neglecting friends, neglecting family, and neglecting sports activities.It is also important to note, that a crucial line of defense is that of primary care medicine – whether it be pediatrics or OB/GYN.

Additionally, teens aren’t seeking out the help being offered.

There are many tools available to help schools get started. Department of Education Office of Safe and Healthy Students 400 Maryland Ave., SW Washington, DC 20202 gov --------------------------------------------------- “National Rates of Adolescent Physical, Psychological, and Sexual Teen-Dating Violence,” Michele Ybarra Ph D, MPH, Center for Innovative Public Health Research; Dorothy L.

Click this link ( to learn about examples of resources for schools. Espelage, Ph D University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne; Jennifer Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Ph D, University of South Alabama; Josephine D.

In fact, less than 10% of teen victims report seeking help. Kids are being abused, resources are available, but the link between the two is missing. What follows are some myths about teen dating violence that may prevent youth from seeking help, or receiving help when they do reach out.

Myth: If a person stays in an abusive relationship, it must not really be that bad. Almost 80% of girls who have been physically abused will continue to date their abusers. These include fear, emotional dependence, low self-esteem, feeling responsible, confusing jealousy and possessiveness with love, threats of more violence, or hope that the abuser will change.

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